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What is a gum infection and how is it treated?

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Gum Infection Treatment from Dr. Richard Bernstein at Hillside Dental
Gum disease is an infection of the structure supporting the teeth. It can be serious and, if left untreated, can lead to tooth loss. Dr. Richard S. Bernstein, has the experience and training necessary to identify gum disease and treat it properly.

How do I know if I have gum disease?

Gum disease can produce several signs and symptoms. Some of the most common include:
  • Bad breath
  • Bright red, inflamed gums
  • Loose teeth
  • Bleeding gums
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth loss
If you recognize any of the symptoms of gum disease, schedule an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible. Gum disease occurs in stages and while the first stage is very treatable, the advanced stage can cause permanent damage. The two stages of gum disease are:

Gingivitis

Gum disease begins as gingivitis which is characterized by inflamed, red gums that sometimes bleed. It’s caused by a plaque buildup on the teeth and can generally be remedied with improved oral hygiene and frequent professional cleanings.

Periodontitis

This is the advanced stage of gum disease and occurs when the plaque buildup begins to extend below the gum line. Bacteria can cause inflammation and pockets to form as the gum pulls away from the teeth. Eventually the infection can damage the bone and lead to tooth loss.

Treatment for gum disease

Dr. Bernstein always strives for the most conservative treatment option available. In many cases of gum disease, non-surgical treatments such as teeth cleanings, increased maintenance appointments or scaling and root planing can eliminate the infection. Regardless of the treatment, patients should continue with more frequent professional cleanings to keep the gums healthy.

The best method for managing gum disease is to practice proper oral hygiene at home and maintain regular professional dental care. To learn more, call Dr. Bernstein today at 248.636.2100.



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